laughingloone:

"…Women’s most feared power over men, then, is the power to say no. To refuse to take care of men. To refuse to service them sexually. To refuse to buy their products. To refuse to worship their God. To refuse to love them…no power in the world can force love from any woman who wishes to withold it."

Barbara G Walker, “The Crone.”

I’m impressed by how much I’ve learned in Neuro and I want to learn more but it also sucked and I hate my worthless grade

My biology professor really likes Shrek omg

thebodiesobtained:

Russian Circles with Chelsea Wolfe - Memorial

Hey what if I was just forward abt more things.  What if

ninaperlman:

Jerry Saltz on photography

ninaperlman:

Jerry Saltz on photography

(Source: fuks)

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Today I ate a peanut butter and jelly sandwich and a bag of warheads

I’m tired of the outsider view which treats cities as urban jungles full of diversity which have to be tamed. I’m tired of the idea that you can just drive through a culture snapping photos and claim to be presenting it to the rest of us. I’m tired of the idea that non-white or native people are exotic objects. I’m tired of the lack of context which results in the photos providing little to no information about the actual culture being depicted.

I’m tired of the way that, even today, so many westerners gush about this kind of photography.

I’m tired of the way that so many people still aspire to create this kind of photography.

We’ve already reached the point where most everything has been photographed. If our goal is to increase the sophistication with which we photograph, a large part of this has to include how we approach and view other cultures.

Which means that this rant in many ways is the other side of the blinders coin. So many of us only see—without realizing it—the white-male perspective that we’ve come to believe that that perspective is what photography is. We need to do better, whether it’s showing how other cultures are representing themselves or explaining why we’re bored of certain points of view.

Nick Vossbrink on “White Guy Photography” or, The Colonial Gaze (via equimby)